culturshock

sizing up media, technology, and society

Posts Tagged ‘Remediation

A Wee(zer)Mix

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Always a tongue-in-cheek group of musicians, Weezer has released the video for their latest single, Pork and Beans, and it bleeds remediation like no other.  A collision of viral internet personalities, memes, and parodies, the video delights as much as it speaks for the “don’t give a hoot about what you think” theme through the lyrics.  Valleywag is putting the video allusion count at 24, albeit with a few possible misses.  Check it out below.

It certainly got me thinking about the role of producers, remix culture, and branding.  By referencing all the memes, and adding their music, Weezer has succeeded in creating something that is both familiar and unique.  The song’s product-placing lyrics mocks the promise that consumer culture makes us: the power to reinvent ourselves in accordance with our own desires.  What actually transpires, however, is a cross-breeding and mish-mashing of particular brand identities that again, produces something familiar and unique.  While the realm of the music video limits itself in time and content, the remixing of consumer identity is a far more complex domain, and one always worthy of further thought.

How do brands mediate your day to day existence? In the last ten minutes, what brands have you encountered? Were they obvious/non-obvious to others?  How and what are the privately mediating brands (of shampoo, contact lenses, email provider, etc) interacting with your self-image? How about the publicly mediating brands (clothing, shoes, beer)?

jon.

Written by jon.

May 24, 2008 at 5:20 pm

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An Experiment in Remediation

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First off, after all my rants about design and interface really mattering to me, WordPress goes ahead and updates their dashboard. Horrah!

Second, enclosed here is an experiment for you to take a gander at. It is what I’ve called an “enhanced” version of my term paper, complete with colour, formatting, pictures, and typos! So check it out and see if it does anything for you. By that I mean, does the hypermediation of my term paper in any way assist, facilitate, augment or detract from the subject matter? I thoroughly enjoyed designing the experience of the words, and hope at the very least, that you enjoy reading it.

Newseum & Remediation (Enhanced)

jon.

Written by jon.

April 4, 2008 at 4:48 pm

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Remediation as Control

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I’ve done some thinking recently about the possibilities of the practice of remediation being at some levels a practice in control, whether social, informational, or legal. This ties with the all-important question that we raised earlier in the semester (and that we should discuss in the Media Charter) of asking “who has the right to remediate”?

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Written by jon.

March 7, 2008 at 4:50 pm

From Print to the Web and Back Again

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hey y’all

Just giving you the heads-up about a site has recently caught my interest for its efforts in the remediating process. A feature on the site Newseum grabs the front page of world newspapers and locates them on an interactive map (or gallery, or list). It’s an interesting and engaging way of bringing localized news and print publications into the fold of “have-it-now” internet media. However, the site only collects the first page as an image and offers access to the content of the paper via the paper’s own website (instead of images of the pages themselves), which might be writing on the wall for the future of print media.  Be sure to check out the cool map function here

The editors of Lifehacker, on the other hand, feel that they should go in the other direction. In order to earn what the mainstream media considers “real world merit”, they have assembled some of the blog’s best tips into a book format in hopes of penetrating more print-oriented consumer markets. I snickered at the book’s 480 page length, as the monthly content of Lifehacker posts (including linked pages) easily tops this. It really makes print seem as slow as molasses when it comes to keeping up with the latest information (an experiment I’m concocting). Being a How-To book, I suppose its value is merited as a guide that you could pick up periodically, but for the true Lifehacker experience, I’d stick to the blog.

How are the Wars of Remediation treating your favourite sources these days?

jon.

Written by jon.

February 6, 2008 at 2:26 pm

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Seminar: Mediating Spaces

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The following is the complete research I used in my section of our seminar on Monday. Thanks to everyone for the support and the participation in the discussion!

In keeping with the week’s theme of media: then and now, I have divided my analysis into two broad sections.First, I seek to analyze how spaces and notions of space have been reshaped, transformed, and problematized through mediation and remediation. Whether incorporated into the spaces themselves, or introduced by their human occupants, the presence of mediating technology has played a number of key roles in the evolution of spaces, in both the literal/physical sense, but also in an intangible, experiential sense.

I hope to progress from this analysis into an examination of what Bolter & Grusin (quoting Marc Auge) “non-places”, spaces “defined not by their associations with local history, or even on the ground upon which they are built, but primarily by the reality of the media they contain” (p 179). Non-local spaces such as shopping malls and bars have reached such heights of hypermediation that any examination of their general functioning inevitably leads us to a consideration of their constituent channels of information. My final point of investigation (to be continued in a later post) will lead us to the entrance of what is perhaps the ultimate non-place, known to many as the World Wide Web. Of the WWW, we can ask questions of its radical remediation and the consequences of its unyielding march forward.

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Written by jon.

January 24, 2008 at 3:55 pm